San Francisco finds an alternative to full encryption of police radios

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Brian
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Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 8:54 pm

San Francisco finds an alternative to full encryption of police radios

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San Francisco finds an alternative to full encryption of police radios

The San Francisco Police Department plans to partially encrypt its radio transmissions when it moves to a digital system sometime after July 1, a police spokesman told the Post on Friday (May 21).
Dispatchers will use certain public channels to send officers to an incident, such as asking units to respond to 123 Main St. for a report of a robbery, according to SFPD spokesman Sgt. Michael Andraychak. Members of the public or the media will be able to hear those transmissions over a police scanner.
After units are dispatched, radio communications regarding the incident will be encrypted and the public won’t be able to listen in, Andraychak said.
But at the conclusion of the incident, dispatchers will state on an unencrypted channel what the outcome was, for example, officers took a report or made an arrest.

Officers will use another set of channels to check a person’s driver’s license information or criminal history, Andraychak said. Those channels will be encrypted.

“It’s sort of striking a balance,” Andraychak said of the new system.

https://padailypost.com/2021/05/24/san- ... ice-radios
Brian
Posts: 1185
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 8:54 pm

Police agencies in San Diego County move toward encryption of two-way radio traffic

Post by Brian »

Police agencies in San Diego County move toward encryption of scanner traffic

The San Diego Police Department is the only agency that won’t move toward full encryption

The order came after the California Department of Justice and FBI reviewed state and federal regulations in light of controversy after cities in eastern Riverside County cut off public access to scanner traffic in late 2018.

In response to the order, law enforcement agencies across the state — including Long Beach, San Jose and Oakland — have moved toward encryption.

The San Francisco Police Department seems to have struck a balance — to a degree. Dispatchers will unencrypt channels to send officers to calls, then switch back to encryption. When incidents come to end, dispatchers will unencrypt channels and broadcast how the call was resolved, Sgt. Michael Andraychak said.

Several police officials said news media will continue to have access to information about emergencies. They pointed to various avenues their departments use to disseminate information: spokespersons, news releases, social media and Nixel, a platform that enables alerts via email and text messages.

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/ne ... -heres-why
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