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CDF Aircraft Showcase

CDF AIRCRAFT SHOWCASE

S-2T AIRTANKER

MANUFACTURER

Grumman Aerospace, Bethpage, New York.

ORIGINAL OWNER

U.S. Navy, 1958-1975; The S-2E/G carrier-based anti-submarine warfare airplane.

ACQUIRED BY CDF

In 1996, CDF acquired 26 S-2E/G planes from the Department of Defense. CDF is converting the planes to a fire fighting configuration and fitting them with modern, powerful turboprop engines. There will be 19 S-2Ts ready for service during the 2004 Fire Season. The completely reconditioned S-2Ts are faster, safer, more maneuverable, and carry a larger retardant payload than the S-2A airtankers CDF has used since the 1970s. The S-2T airtanker is part of CDF's air program modernization efforts that will result in the safest and most efficient mix of aircraft to carryout the fire fighting mission. A combination of S-2Ts and S-2As will be used by CDF until a total of 23 S-2Ts replace all of the older S-2As by the 2005 Fire Season.

MISSION

CDF uses the S-2T and S-2A airtankers for fast initial attack delivery of fire retardant on wildland fires.

CREW

One pilot

PAYLOAD

1,200 gallons long-term fire retardant

SPECIFICATIONS

GROSS WEIGHT: 29,150 pounds

CRUISE SPEED: 258 mph

ENDURANCE: 4.5 hours

WING SPAN: 73 feet

ENGINES: Two (2) Garrett TPE331-14GR turbine engines. (1,650 horsepower each).


S-2A AIRTANKER

 

MANUFACTURER

Grumman Aerospace, Bethpage, New York.

ORIGINAL OWNER

U.S. Navy, 1952-1972. The S-2A was used as a carrier-based anti-submarine warfare airplane.

ACQUIRED BY CDF

In 1972, CDF acquired 19 S-2As from the Department of Defense. The first S-2As converted for fire fighting were placed in service for the 1973 Fire Season. The S-2A is an efficient and reliable part of CDF's fire fighting force. The Department is currently integrating its airtanker fleet with newer, faster and more maneuverable turbine S-2T airtankers. There will be 19 S-2T airtankers in service for the 2004 Fire Season, along with 4 S-2As. 

MISSION

CDF uses the S-2T and the S-2A airtankers for fast initial attack delivery of fire

retardant on wildland fires.

CREW

One pilot

PAYLOAD

800 gallons long-term fire retardant

SPECIFICATIONS

GROSS WEIGHT: 27,000 pounds

CRUISE SPEED: 195 mph

RANGE: 1,000 miles

ENDURANCE: 4.5 hours

WING SPAN: 70 feet

ENGINES: Two (2) Wright R-1820-82; 9 cylinder radials (1,500 horsepower each).


UH-1H SUPER HUEY HELICOPTER

MANUFACTURER

Bell Helicopters, Fort Worth, Texas.

ORIGINAL OWNER

U.S. Army, 1963 to 1975. The UH-1H was used as a troop and cargo transport and specialized operations.

ACQUIRED BY CDF

In 1981, CDF acquired 12 helicopters from the Department of Defense. They were heavily modified by CDF for fire fighting use and went into service in 1989. CDF has 9 helicopters available statewide for the 2004 Fire Season.

MISSION

CDF uses the Super Hueys for fast initial attack on wildfires. The copters are able to quickly deliver a nine-person fire crew wherever needed as well as battle fires with water/foam drops. The copters are also used for medical evacuations, backfiring operations on wildland fires, to ignite prescribed burns using either a helitorch or a ping-pong ball machine - Chemical Ignition Device System (CIDS), cargo transport (internal and external loads), re-seeding operations, infra-red mapping of incidents, and numerous non-fire emergency missions.

Since 1997, CDF helicopter crews have been trained to do "short haul" rescues. Short haul involves a crew member being lowered from a hovering helicopter to an injured or trapped person below. Once hooked to a harness or basket, both the victim and crew member are then carried a short distance to safety. 

CREW

One pilot, two fire captains, and eight firefighters.

PAYLOAD

Bucket operations - 324 gallons of water/foam.

Fixed tank - 360 gallons of water/foam with pilot controlled drop volumes.

SPECIFICATIONS

GROSS WEIGHT: 10,500 pounds

CRUISE SPEED: 126 mph

RANGE: 250 miles

ENDURANCE: 2 hours

ROTOR DIAMETER: 48 feet

ENGINES: Turbine Lycoming T-53-703 derated from 1800 horsepower.


OV-10A AIRTACTICAL AIRCRAFT

MANUFACTURER

North American-Rockwell, Columbus, Ohio.

ORIGINAL OWNER

U.S. Navy/Marines, 1968-1993. The OV-10A was used as a counter-insurgency aircraft and close air-support to military ground forces.

ACQUIRED BY CDF

In 1993, CDF acquired 15 OV-10As from the Department of Defense. Of those 15, 13 have been converted for use as air attack planes for the 2004 Fire Season. The OV-10s replaced the original Cessna 0-2As that CDF had been using for air attack. The OV-10s are newer, larger, faster, provide a larger field of vision for the crew and are more maneuverable than the older O-2As.

MISSION

CDF uses the OV-10As as command and control of aircraft on wildland fires.  The crew provides tactical coordination with the incident commander on the ground, providing information on the movement and spread of the fire. The OV-10A crew then directs CDF's airtanker and helicopter pilots on where to make their retardant and water drops.

CREW

Pilot and observer

SPECIFICATIONS

GROSS WEIGHT: 10,500 pounds

CRUISE SPEED: 219 mph

RANGE: 1,000 miles

ENDURANCE: 5 hours

WING SPAN: 40 feet

ENGINES: Two (2) Garrett T-76 turbines (715 horsepower each).


Short Haul Rescue

Short haul is an emergency rescue tool meant to quickly get an individual out of a dangerous situation and place them in a safe location. Short haul involves a rescuer being lowered on a rope from a hovering helicopter, to a victim below. After the rescuer rigs a harness to the victim, or if injuries warrant, places the victim in a stokes litter basket, the helicopter lifts both to safety a short distance away.  CDF initiated a Short Haul Rescue program in 1997 to augment the Departmentís all-risk emergency response role in California. All CDF helitack crews (about 180 personnel) completed short haul training by early July 1998.  Short haul training takes approximately 50 hours and combines hands-on and practical exercises with classroom training. Emphasis is placed on the need for teamwork between the pilot, crew chief, rescue supervisor and the rescuer who is lowered to the ground. Safety of the victim, as well as the flight crew, is stressed throughout training. After passing the course, crew members must maintain their rescue certification by demonstrating their skill level every three months.  CDF crews may only perform short haul rescues during daylight hours, in good visibility, after assessing the risk to the crew and the victim, and when no other timely method of rescue can be performed.  The Department established this policy in recognition of the high degree of risk associated with this type of rescue operation.